BlogPhotography Painting Exhibitions Projects Victor Chin Portfolio

The traditional wooden houses with attap roof at one time in Kg Hakka Mantin. The attap roofs had been replaced with zinc ones over time but the form and use of these houses continue even today. But many had been abandoned by the owners recently due to insecurity of land rights. This is another case of the rights of the citizen to stay vs the rights of private and state rights to developed at any price.

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Machinchang landscape

October 1st, 2014

New abstract landscape acrylic paintings on show inspired by the 50 million years old geology in Landkawi.

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Will be taking part in this art event
Invitation

My new series of digital drawing of the traditional vernacular wooden homes in Kampung Hakka Mantin. These early buildings were built by experienced carpenter/builders, before the days of the architects. There is a native spirit of geometric simplicity and clarity about these basic house forms. Using mainly local materials these structures are adapt to the tropical conditions and all the basic needs of the residents and their families. Early example of sustainability with a low carbon foot print. This series of drawings has been inspired by Sharon Chin’s recent drawings of the people and homes in Kg mantin.

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Jalan Sultan, (detail) watercolour by Victor Chin

Jalan Sultan is one of the early streets of Kuala Lumpur. In the 1900s most of the buildings were mainly shophouses, whether single- or double-story. This confluence of the Klang and Gombak Rivers which we now know as Kuala Lumpur soon became the commercial centre of the then-Malaya which was under British rule.

The largest group of residents were the Chinese from China followed by the Indians from India. These groups of workers worked in the tin mines and later, the rubber estates. Many of these migrant workers later set up homes here.

The local Malays were mainly happy in their kampongs but soon many of them became civil servants in the colonial government offices in the towns.  Lumpur is like many of the other Malaysian towns, built mainly on the wealth of the tin and rubber industries which were mostly owned by the European companies, the Sultans and a few local Chinese at one time. Most of the streets in the old business district were built between the two World Wars (1915 and 1945) when Malaya was the world’s largest producer of tin and rubber.

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